"Click each station to find out more about our exhibits at the German Pavilion."
01
01
Offshore wind farm

Wind power is one of the most important renewable energy sources; this exhibit showcases offshore wind farm technology and the leading role that German researchers are playing in the world arena. See how installations weighing hundreds of tonnes each are set up, and the stress they are subjected to from wind and waves – such as in the North Sea. Other topics include the impact of offshore wind farms on the environment, and the situation of wind energy in Korea.

02
02
Mudflats

Mudflats are among the most productive ecosystems on earth, and this exhibit compares Europe's North Sea Wattenmeer mudflats – a UNESCO World Heritage Site – with the Korean mudflats. Learn how the unique habitats have been created, and about the greater degree of biodiversity in Korea compared to the Wattenmeer mudflats; there are also differences in the role that fisheries and tourism play in mudflats as well as in land reclamation.

03
03
Noise at sea

Sound spreads to great depths under the water's surface; many marine species use sonar and hearing for orientation, and excess noise in the sea's depths can have a negative impact on marine fauna. The exhibit shows the wide variety of ocean noise from human sources, and compares different acoustic sources such as marine propulsion systems, sonar and pile driving while laying foundations for offshore wind farms.

04
04
Ecological shipping

Ships are the lifeline of global trade with more than ninety percent of all goods transported by sea. The exhibit presents Germany's groundbreaking concepts aimed at a zero-emissions ship of the future. Find out about different types of eco-friendly ship, tall ships from the future to the Sonne deep-sea research vessel to hydrogen and fuel cell-based models.

05
05
Tidal power plants

The ever-recurring cycle of ebb and flow presents huge potential in energy production; this interactive exhibit simulates the orbit of the moon and the workings of a tidal power plant. In addition to the Korean Sihwa tidal power plant – currently the world's largest at 254 MW output –, this exhibit showcases a new tidal turbine from Germany intended for Korea's new Jeollanam-do tidal power plant.

06
06
Ballast water

Species introduced into foreign habitats by human activity can disturb the delicate ecological balance in their new habitats. The exhibit provides examples of these invasive species that are a particularly unwelcome guest to the ocean in ballast water emanating from ships crossing the oceans. A world map traces the routes of the mitten crab and North Pacific starfish, presenting the consequences of global migration.

07
07
Tsunami early-warning system

Tsunamis pose a formidable destructive danger, threatening millions of people on continental coasts. This exhibit showcases a tsunami early-warning system developed in Germany and installed off the coast of Indonesia to give information on giant wave formation. A computer simulation shows how waves propagate from the epicentre of an earthquake towards the coast, demonstrating how a tsunami early-warning system works.

08
08
Expedition

Life in the deep sea is full of secrets replete with bizarre fauna and flora. This exhibit uses a complex video installation to give you a closer look at events as they take place in the world underneath the water's surface. Jump aboard a modern diving submersible research robot as it plunges into the depths, marvel at the rare high-definition images, and discover those creatures of the deep at several thousand metres below the sea surface.

09
09
Overfishing

Overfishing is a serious threat to biodiversity in the oceans; this exhibit is an interactive demonstration of the problem of overfishing, and is open to groups of up to four people at a time. Try to gain as many points as possible from fishing on a playing field representing the ocean; the fish numbers decrease after each catch, however, and numbers need time to recover. The secret is to fish the right amounts so the fish numbers can grow again.

10
10
Waste at sea

About seventy percent of the waste we leave in the oceans consists of plastic. This extremely long-lived waste product is a global threat to many marine species; this exhibit traces the route taken by ever-smaller plastic particles covering thousands of miles through the oceans. Three glass cylinders with waste of different origins await you for you to analyse their contents and the place they were found.

10a
10a
Global duck experiment

A container ship on its way from Hong Kong to the United States had an accident twenty years ago. Amongst other things, the container ship was loaded with rubber ducks. Some of these 28,800 bathtub toys are still plying the oceans today – after two decades. The exhibit traces the routes that these rubber duckies have taken as they float their merry way through the oceans, routes that can reach thousands of miles.

11
11
Mysterious worlds

We have put more research into the moon's surface than into the seabed; this exhibit brings you a step closer to the unknown world of the deep sea. Use a laser to explore different points on a world map, and all the deep-sea creatures and phenomena at home there. You will meet the frilled shark and discover bacteria reefs, mud volcanoes, and the Lost City – an underwater world with towers of limestone dozens of metres high four thousand kilometres east of Florida.

12
12
Sponges

Sponges have inhabited the earth for more than six hundred million years, and are the oldest known multicellular animals on the planet. This exhibit presents the different habitats of these anatomically amorphous creatures. You will learn about the history of sponges and the seven and a half thousand species of them living on Earth, their abilities and their characteristics, including the symbiotic relationships they enter into with other life forms such as algae.

13
13
ARGO Project

Data acquisition in the oceans is a great challenge to researchers; the ARGO Project plays a pioneering role in long-term observation, a project spanning twenty-three participant countries. More than three thousand probes have been distributed over the oceans to measure water temperature, salinity, and speed of movement. The exhibit shows one of the probes as an interactive model together with information on other data acquisition projects such as sea gliders and stationary observatories.

14
14
Methane hydrate

The sea floor has methane hydrates lying dormant in natural gas reserves estimated at thirty times the size of those in ordinary deposits. This exhibit focuses on possibilities of ecological methane hydrate extraction from the deep sea. Another topic is the International Sugar Project that examines whether greenhouse gas CO2 can be stored in place of the extracted methane hydrate on the seafloor.

14a
14a
Danger from the deep?

Rising methane gas bubbles pose a threat to shipping, and this exhibit demonstrates the theory behind these blow-outs, as these events are referred to. A press of a button sends air bubbles up in an aquarium with a ship model; this simulates a methane blow-out. These bubbles bring the density of the gas-water mixture down to levels lower than water density, and a vessel travelling square on or off the side of this gas-water mixture will capsize and sink in seconds.

15
15
Manganese nodules

A manganese nodule belt stretches over the Pacific seabed from the west coast of Mexico to Hawaii, nodules that represent a major reserve of raw materials. In addition to manganese, they contain nickel, copper, cobalt, and rare minerals. This exhibit explains how these coveted nodules develop, showing the mining areas and an outlook on future procedures for ecological raw-material extraction from these nodules with a multimedia showcase presenting a manganese nodule from the original area.

16
16
Black Smokers

Black smokers fire jets of water at temperatures reaching 400°C from the seabed, and are home to a wide range of fauna and flora, but this black smoke also contains precious metals such as copper, zinc, silver, and gold. The exhibit explains the origin and occurrence of these undersea chimneys, and how the raw materials might be ecologically extracted in the future. A small piece of black smoker will be presented in a multimedia showcase.

17
17
Undersea oil extraction

Experts believe that around a quarter of the world's oil reserves lie under the seabed, explaining the increasing numbers of offshore oil fields. The exhibit shows how oil can be extracted from depths of more than two thousand metres using floating platforms. Extraction stations on the seabed are the future, and the German ISUP project has designed a solution for such extraction stations at more than two thousand metres' depth a hundred kilometres offshore.